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What is your Fund Development Budget Goal?

  In this series on fund development, we began by discussing how your organization can have a diversified revenue portfolio. We have discussed having different sources of revenue coming multiple “buckets” and strategies to leverage each of those funding opportunities. Today, we are focusing on your fund development goal and plan. Annually, nonprofit organizations establish a budget based on expected revenue and expenses. Simultaneously, nonprofit Boards should also have an annual fund development goal and a 3-year fund development goal. These fund development goals should be divided amongst your different revenue “buckets” and each should be included in your annual budget, so that your Board, executive team and fund development staff can track your progress against your current budget and

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The Status of Girls in Indiana

  Last month, St. Mary’s College in Notre Dame released a Report on the Status of Girls in Indiana 2013. This Report can provide valuable information to non-profits serving girls to help shape programming efforts to provide additional positive outcomes. The goal of this report is to highlight the status of girls between the ages of 10 and 19 years old. Data specific to girls in the report has been pulled from many sources, including various state and federal government agencies and non-profit organizations, with the intent of centralizing and summarizing available information regarding girls in Indiana. Some key data in the report include: Population: Indiana’s girls are not as diverse as U.S. girls overall (80 percent of Indiana’s girls

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Four Steps to Create an Evaluation Plan for Your Organization

  What is your organization’s evaluation plan for validating the impact that you provide to the community? Nonprofits should have a “roadmap” to validate the impact of their work beyond “numbers served”. If you don’t have a plan or it is time to update the current plan, there are some simple steps that you can take to be on your way to collecting and reporting meaningful data that demonstrates the change that you are making in the community. 1.    Have a clear organizational or program purpose. A good tool to use is a logic model framework that aligns your goals, activities and resources. 2.    Create systems and tools to validate your impact.  Questions to consider include what data collection tools

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Transformational Organizations: Economic Opportunities through Education by 2015 (EcO15)

  EcO15 is a great example of a public-private partnership that was created to improve economic opportunities within a community by focusing on education and its residents. Funded by grants from Lilly Endowment Inc., and regional industry and community partners, EcO15 is led by the Community Education Coalition (CEC) of Columbus, Indiana and Heritage Fund – the Community Foundation of Bartholomew County. The first phase of EcO15, included an investment of $38 million in infrastructure and common support services with an overarching goal of helping each person in southeast Indiana move up at least one level in their education, training or job placement within the region’s three strongest economic clusters: advanced manufacturing, health care, and hospitality/tourism. The second phase includes:

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Can a nonprofit charge for its services?

  Can a nonprofit charge for its services? The answer is yes, but as with all fund development planning, this should be undertaken with great care. Recently, Transform Consulting Group blogged about how revenue diversification may be the key to lessening future losses in times of economic difficulty. A detailed Fund Development plan should include funding from many different sources or “buckets”, including contracts and fees for services. A fee-for-service structure means fees are paid in return for services delivered, making money on the same kinds of services your nonprofit provides already. While not usually a major source of income, nonprofits can use fee for service and contracts as a supplement to other funding. The beauty of fee for service

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2014 Journey Fellowship Recruitment

  The Journey, under the care of AYS Inc., is home to a variety of programs that seek to support the renewal and professionalization of current and prospective youth workers in Indiana and around the country. The Journey offers fellowships for those who have a passion for serving young people — both practicing professionals and students who are considering making youth work part of their career. The Journey is currently looking for nominees for three separate fellowships: The Executive Journey Fellowship is for experienced Youth Workers of influence. Fellows attend four all-expense-paid retreats throughout the year focused on personal and professional leadership and renewal, benefit from executive coaching, have the opportunity to connect with national leaders in the youth development

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Women in Nonprofits Leadership Symposium

  Women across the state who dedicate their lives to worthy causes in the nonprofit sector will have the opportunity to attend a Women in Nonprofits Leadership Symposium on October 24th, in Kokomo. The Women in Nonprofits Leadership Symposium is designed to connect and inspire the women who strive daily to improve our communities and the lives of the people in them. Attendees will have opportunities to learn from other women leaders, explore areas of personal and professional growth, and to consider leadership not just as a skill to be acquired but as a web of connectivity where collective good is at the center. The symposium will feature three areas of focus: Personal and Professional Development: Getting Out of Your

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How to Make Participatory Events Part of Your Organization’s Fundraising Plan

  Recently, Transform Consulting Group blogged about how revenue diversification may be the key to lessening future losses in times of economic difficulty. As we discussed, a detailed Fund Development plan should include funding from many different revenue sources or “buckets”. Fundraising events should be one of your organization’s “buckets” of revenue. One of the benefits of this funding source, unlike grants or fees-for-service, is that there are usually “no strings” attached to this funding source. As a result, an organization can use this revenue to pay for indirect and administrative costs like staffing, technology, or perhaps other infrastructure needs. Successful special events not only raise money, but also create publicity, attract members and volunteers, engage and recruit board members,

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$100K Prize for Young Innovators in Social Justice

The 2014 Grinnell College Young Innovator for Social Justice Prize will award $100,000 to a person under 40 anywhere in the world who creates positive social change. Up to three awards of $100,000 will be presented, with half the prize money going to the individual(s) and half to social justice organization(s) selected by the winners. The program hopes to attract nominations across a wide range of fields, including science, medicine, the environment, humanities, business, economics, education, law, public policy, social services, religion and ethics, as well as projects that cross these boundaries. No affiliation with Grinnell College is required. The eligible nominee must: Not have turned 40 by January 1, 2014; Have an exceptional record of substantive, innovative contributions within

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New Research on the Effectiveness of Child Abuse Intervention Programs

The National Academies’ Institute of Medicine and National Research Council have released “New Directions in Child Abuse and Neglect Research.” Commissioned by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services’ Administration for Children, Youth and Families, the report examines research findings on the extent, causes, and consequences of child abuse and neglect and the effectiveness of intervention programs. It also provides recommendations for establishing a coordinated national infrastructure to support future child abuse and neglect research. The report states that research is unanimous that the most effective programs target parents as the primary change agents. In these interventions, children may not even receive treatment and the interventions are fully parent mediated, especially in the case of younger children. Even in cases with

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